Collecting Celebrity Signed Checks

Collecting checks signed by famous people is a fascinating hobby enjoyed by many autograph enthusiasts around the world. Autographs on checks have special appeal because the signature on the face of a check is usually authentic, the autograph is on a document that is easy to store and maintain, and an interesting story about the signer may be associated with the check.

Autographs on slips of paper, photos, and cards, are easy to forge. A bit of talent and practice is sometimes all that is needed to create a masterful forgery that can fool even the most seasoned experts. The famous forger Joseph Costey proudly sold his expertly crafted letters of famous Americans to experienced autograph dealers. Unlike letters and other types of documents, the issuing bank verifies signatures on checks. Forgers are also discouraged by the trouble it takes to print fake checks and add a signature. There are also substantial penalies that are aggressively enforced for fraudulent use of checks.

Unlike lengthy autographed manuscripts or signed first-edition books that quickly usurp a collector's space for collectibles, checks are small in size and can easily be maintained in Mylar-D sleeves that designed for archival storage. Checks can be easily categorized and quickly retrieved for viewing, study, and fascinating enjoyment.

Checks we write reflect our interest and habits. They provide a revealing glimpse of our lifestyle from day to day. Checks and financial biography is the basis of the fascinating book, Money Secrets of the Rich and Famous. For example, a check shown in this book that is signed by Rod Serling for a Phaeton car reflects his passion for antique cars. A check written by Robert Frost associated with his travel to Washington, DC is associated with his recital of a poem at the John Kennedy presidential inauguration.

Check collecting has fascinated generations of collectors. Autographed checks have special appeal because of their inherent assurance of authenticity and their revealing associations.



Source by David Thoreau